At Home Self Myofascial Release Tips

4
May
2020
Health and Wellness, Massage Therapy

At Home Self Myofascial Release Tips

We all know that having regular massages can help relieve stress and promote relaxation. Did you know massages can also improve flexibility? One of the ways it does this through a technique called myofascial release – a stretching technique used to slowly release tension and pressure in all tissue layers of the body from the skin down through the muscles.

While you’re still waiting to see your favourite Massage Therapist, you can achieve this same flexibility at home, with these easy-to-follow self-myofascial release exercises*:

Back: Place a foam roller on the ground while slowly and gently rolling your upper and middle back on top of it. This allows your muscles and connective tissue to stretch into a more upright posture.

Neck and Shoulders: Place a ball on the ground under your shoulders or neck. Then, slowly stretch your neck and arms. You should be able to feel the muscles and fascia stretch where you feel the ball.

Hip Flexors: Lay down on your stomach in the push-up position, leaving your hips on the ground. With your arms, gently lift your shoulders and chest off the ground.

IT Band: Place a fascial release tool such as a foam roller or ball on the floor and place it under the side of your leg. Roll the tool from your hip to the side of your knee. Then switch to the other side.

Follow these great at-home exercises to tide you over until we can see you again.

 

*Before performing these exercises, consult with your doctor.

* Introductory offers valid for first time visit only. Not valid for gift cards. Massage and Facial sessions include a full 50-minute hands-on service and additional time for consultation and dressing.

Offers may not be combined. Prices do not include taxes. Prices and services are subject to change and may vary by location.

* Free gift card offer only valid in-spa. Location offers vary from spa to spa.

Proud supporter of Heart & Stroke

Massage by a registered massage therapist can help reduce stress, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke.
However, before getting a massage, check with your doctor to make sure it is right for you.

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